Target Pistols

In the world of Free Pistol, Mr Pardini, with his PGP 75 (1975) with its bolt action, had developed something new. In the 1980’s the PGP 75 evolved into the K50; in 1990 the innovative K22 model came into production, a model which once again has a sliding bolt, that no longer rotates. On the back of this, in 2008 we developed two new models: FPM with a mechanical trigger and the FPE, the first Pardini free pistol with an electronic trigger
The range of Pardini semi-automatic target shooting pistols was completely renewed in 1991 with the arrival of the SP caliber 22lr, the GP 22 short and the HP caliber 32 S&W long wad cutter models. These models boast a series of characteristics that place them among the limited number of the best competitive firearms. Pardini’s innovative design details in order to make these guns “shootable” are numerous. First of all, the pistol’s bolt face and center of balance are closely connected: this helps to minimize the disturbance of its position while firing. Moreover, in 2001 a new lightweight counterbalance was introduced incorporating an inertial device that reduces felt recoil: consisting of four mobile steel weights, each held by a small spring in four cylindrical recesses, parallel to the barrel axis. The validity of this idea inspired Pardini in 2004 to design a new counterbalance with six mobile weights ( SP New and HP New Models);while at the same time a new frame in aluminium alloy was introduced , that was achieved by machine milling to remove material. The GP caliber 22 short model was developed in collaboration with the renowned champion German marksman Ralf Schumann. The GP Schumann established itself at the top of the Olympic Rapid fire Pistol event. In 2001 the GPE was produced, its most important feature being its electronic trigger. The Athens Olympics in 2004 was the last in which competitors shot with the 22 short caliber in the Rapid fire Pistol event. The Pardini GPE has proudly closed this era, winning the gold medal with its “customary” Schumann.